Funds raised support more than 47,500 children, youth and adults with an intellectual disability currently participating in Special Olympics programing across the country

TORONTO–On July 20, Tim Hortons guests across the country raised a record $150,000 for Special Olympics athletes on Global Day of Inclusion by purchasing a limited edition donut, with 100% of proceeds going to Special Olympics across Canada. Global Day of Inclusion raises awareness and funds for Special Olympics Canada, so it can continue to empower Canadians with an intellectual disability to reach their potential through daily sport programs.

This year’s donut was created by 26-year-old Special Olympics Ontario athlete, Tori Ranson. Tori’s donut was a cruller sliced in half, filled with whipped topping and decorated with vanilla fondant and red sprinkles. Tori is an active member of the Georgetown and Milton Special Olympics clubs.

“Through Special Olympics I have made lots of friends over the last 12 years. I was excited to see people eating my donut – I’m glad they liked it and that we raised lots of money for Special Olympics Canada.”
– Tori Ranson, Athlete, Special Olympics Ontario

“We want to thank our guests and restaurant owners who came out in record numbers to support Global Day of Inclusion this year. We were able to raise a record amount for Special Olympics across Canada so they can continue their mission to empower children, youth and adults through the power of sport.”
– Alex Macedo, President, Tim Hortons

“The second annual Global Day of Inclusion was a resounding success. We’re so happy that Canadians loved Tori’s donut so much that a record amount was raised for Special Olympics programs across the country – Canadians truly demonstrated that they believe we are better together.”
– Sarah Eyton, Vice President, Fund Development, Special Olympics Canada

Tim Hortons is one of North America’s largest restaurant chains operating in the quick service segment. Founded as a single location in Canada in 1964, Tim Hortons appeals to a broad range of guest tastes, with a menu that includes premium coffee, hot and cold specialty drinks (including lattes, cappuccinos and espresso shots), specialty teas and fruit smoothies, fresh baked goods, grilled Panini and classic sandwiches, wraps, soups, prepared foods and other food products. Tim Hortons has more than 4,800 system wide restaurants located in Canada, the United States and around the world. More information about the company is available at www.timhortons.com.

The Canadian chapter of this international movement is dedicated to enriching the lives of Canadians with an intellectual disability through the transformative power and joy of sport. Operating out of sport clubs in 12 Provincial and Territorial Chapters, this grassroots movement reaches beyond the sphere of sport to empower individuals, change attitudes and build communities. From two-year-olds to mature adults, more than 47,500 athletes with an intellectual disability are registered in Special Olympics year-round programs across Canada. They are supported by more than 22,000 volunteers, including more than 16,000 trained coaches.

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